WarholCapote Act II
Oct
4
7:30pm 7:30pm

WarholCapote Act II

Following the performance of "WarholCapote" at the American Repertory Theater, Jesse Aron Green and Mary Schneider-Enriquez (Houghton Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Harvard Art Museums) will take part in a discussion about the legacies of Andy Warhol, Truman Capote, and Pop Art. The event is part of the A.R.T.'s "Act II" series of post-performance discussions.

The series will also feature the following speakers:

09/20/17: Jace Clayton

09/27/17: Rob Roth

09/28/17: Rob Roth

10/03/17:  Dick Lehr

10/11/17: "Baby" Jane Holzer

10/12/17: Rob Roth

These discussions are free and open to ticket-holders of any WARHOLCAPOTE performance, subject to availability. Recordings of discussions will be available on the A.R.T. website. For more information, please contact A.R.T. Ticket Services at 617.547.8300. Schedule subject to change.

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MacDowell Colony Fellowship
Oct
29
to Dec 18

MacDowell Colony Fellowship

From the MacDowell Colony website:

"The mission of The MacDowell Colony is to nurture the arts by offering creative individuals of the highest talent an inspiring environment in which they can produce enduring works of the imagination.

The sole criterion for acceptance to The MacDowell Colony is artistic excellence. MacDowell defines excellence in a pluralistic and inclusive way, encouraging applications from artists representing the widest possible range of perspectives and demographics.

We welcome artists engaging in the broadest spectrum of artistic practice who are investigating an unlimited array of inquiries and concerns. We apply the same egalitarian standards for all those who serve MacDowell either in a staff, volunteer, or representative capacity.

At its founding, the Colony was an experiment with no precedent. It stands now having provided crucial time and space to more than 6,000 artists, including such notable names as Leonard Bernstein, Thornton Wilder, Aaron Copland, Milton Avery, James Baldwin, Spalding Gray, and more recently Alice Walker, Alice Sebold, Jonathan Franzen, Michael Chabon, Suzan-Lori Parks, Meredith Monk, and many more."

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Round Peg / Square Hole: Films on the Body (Program Three)
Jul
18
1:00pm 1:00pm

Round Peg / Square Hole: Films on the Body (Program Three)

The Harvard Art Museums are presenting a series of films and videos in conjunction with the exhibition Jesse Aron Green: Ärtzliche Zimmergymnastik. Programmed by the artist, Round Peg/Square Hole: Films on the Body explores the everyday movement of the human body.

This third installment in the series, titled Deviation: Locating Identity in Difference, features Yvonne Rainer’s Trio A (10 min.), Lisa Steele’s Birthday Suit with Scars and Defects (13 min.), Charles Atlas’s Rainer Variations (42 min.), and Elisabeth Subrin’s The Fancy (35 min.).

The films and videos in this series complement and complicate an understanding of Jesse Aron Green’s multilayered and multidisciplinary works. Green will address these connections, as well as speak more generally about them, as part of his introduction to each installment in the series. 

The event will be held in Menschel Hall, Lower Level. Free admission

Support for this program is provided by the Richard L. Menschel Endowment Fund. Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.

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Round Peg / Square Hole: Films on the Body (Program Two)
Jul
17
1:00pm 1:00pm

Round Peg / Square Hole: Films on the Body (Program Two)

The Harvard Art Museums are presenting a series of films and videos in conjunction with the exhibition Jesse Aron Green: Ärtzliche Zimmergymnastik. Programmed by the artist, Round Peg/Square Hole: Films on the Body explores the everyday movement of the human body.

This second installment in the series, titled Drills: The Performance of Routine, features Sharon Lockhart’s Goshogaoka (63 min.), Peter Downsbrough’s Occupied (19 min.), and William Forsythe’s One Flat Thing Reproduced (26 min.).

The films and videos in this series complement and complicate an understanding of Jesse Aron Green’s multilayered and multidisciplinary works. Green will address these connections, as well as speak more generally about them, as part of his introduction to each installment in the series. 

The event will be held in Menschel Hall, Lower Level. Free admission

Support for this program is provided by the Richard L. Menschel Endowment Fund. Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.

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Round Peg / Square Hole: Films on the Body (Program One)
Jul
16
6:00pm 6:00pm

Round Peg / Square Hole: Films on the Body (Program One)

The Harvard Art Museums are presenting a series of films and videos in conjunction with the exhibition Jesse Aron Green: Ärtzliche Zimmergymnastik. Programmed by the artist, Round Peg/Square Hole: Films on the Body explores the everyday movement of the human body.

This first installment in the series, titled Deadpan: The Comedy of the Everyday, features Buster Keaton’s Playhouse (22 min.), Bruce Nauman’s Dance or Exercise around the Perimeter of a Square (18 min.), Martha Rosler’s Semiotics of the Kitchen (6 min.), and Charles Atlas’s Hail the New Puritan (85 min.). 

The films and videos in this series complement and complicate an understanding of Jesse Aron Green’s multilayered and multidisciplinary works. Green will address these connections, as well as speak more generally about them, as part of his introduction to each installment in the series. 

The event will be held in Menschel Hall, Lower Level. Free admission

Support for this program is provided by the Richard L. Menschel Endowment Fund. Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.

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Let's Dance
Jun
20
to Oct 18

Let's Dance

  • Art Stations Foundation (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

LET’S DANCE

Art Stations gallery, Stary Browar, Poznań

Artists: Akademia Ruchu, Atoms for Peace, Alexandra Bachzetsis, Wojciech Bąkowski, Vanessa Beecroft, Jérôme Bel, Beyoncé, Tim Etchells & Forced Entertainment, Dan Flavin, Massimo Furlan, Frédéric Gies, Jesse Aron Green, Trajal Harrell, Christian Jankowski, Spike Jonze, Jungle, Alicja Karska & Aleksandra Went, The Knife, Katarzyna Kozyra, Tony Orrico, Rick Owens, Agnieszka Polska, Yvonne Rainer, R.E.M., Józef Robakowski, Piotr Wysocki & Dominik Jałowiński, Artur Żmijewski

Curators: Joanna Leśnierowska, Tomasz Plata, Agnieszka Sosnowska 

A dance stage turned into a gym? Or the parquet in a disco? Or a fashion show catwalk? Modern dance more and more often occurs in an intermediary sphere: between the conventions of art and the spaces of ordinary behaviour. Choreographers and visual arts artists are looking ever closer at that which is under their noses – how we move on the street, in clubs, while jogging, at social gatherings and even during sex. And they’re making it their subject. Of course, their practice would be hard to imagine (and hard to comprehend, to say the least), if earlier in the mid-60s the creators of post-modern dance hadn’t decided that dance could be anything – even typical walking or running. Today, we’re still coming to terms with the consequences of that discovery: not only do we see onstage the simplest daily  gestures, but we also frequently view amateur dancers almost as the direct inheritors of the classics of post modern dance. A woman dancing alone at a bus stop? A man dancing on the treadmill in a gym? It’s almost conceptual dance. Online we can find videos of similar events and enjoy them, as if we’d discovered some new, wonderful artists. 

Before our very eyes, dance is becoming more and more democratic. Everybody dances – amateurs, stars, celebrities. Those who in the common understanding “know” how to do it, and those who aren’t entirely successful. What’s more, everyone’s copying one another, and so we’re becoming more and more aware that the patterns suggested to us by the mass culture of movement are subtly, but effectively disciplining us. Dance liberates us, but also subordinates. Observing the process of the democratisation of dance today, we have to notice its flip side: among other things, the achievements of all these artists in whose work dance is not so much a promise of unrestricted expression, as a metaphor of social conditioning.

The Let’s Dance project is an attempt at describing that tension. Fragments of the most important pieces of dance theatre in recent years are juxtaposed here with the works of renowned visual artists, with music videos in which dance plays a leading role, with amateur films found on the Internet. Viewers are prompted to react by specially prepared installations – to even more clearly make them aware that their movements also deserve to be called dance. The starting point is provided by important pieces from the Grażyna Kulczyk Collection, above all the installation which hasn’t been shown in Poland before, by Dan Flavin, one of the most renowned American minimalists and a highly important reference point for post modern dance. It was Flavin who was one of the first to argue that more important than the art objects is the movement they generate - a sort of dance of the viewers around them.

The place where Let’s Dance is staged is no accident. The Art Stations Foundation by Grażyna Kulczyk is a unique institution within which, for years, dance and visual arts have coexisted. It’s an ideal place for a project where the borders between these two areas of art become hard to spot, in fact invisible.

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"Artists Sometimes Have Feelings;" or, Toward an Aesthetics of Reconciliation
May
27
6:00pm 6:00pm

"Artists Sometimes Have Feelings;" or, Toward an Aesthetics of Reconciliation

From the website of the Harvard Art Museums:

"Jesse Aron Green will speak on May 27th at 6pm—the eve of Harvard University's 364th Commencement—about his exhibition Ärztliche Zimmergymnastik at the Harvard Art Museums, on view from May 23 to August 9, 2015. 

Mr. Green will begin his remarks by revisiting the exhibition of Edgar Degas in 1911, the first granted by the Fogg Museum to a living artist. "Art is a not dead,” the museum’s director Edward Forbes said at the time, adding one significant drawback to the vitality of contemporary art: ”Artists sometimes have feelings." Mr. Green will expand upon Forbe’s comments in light of the history of the University, its relationship to art and artists, his own personal history and development, and his current artistic practice, which often attempts to reconcile historical forces with the affective conditions of contemporary life."

Video of the lecture and a slideshow of images both available here.

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Ärztliche Zimmergymnastik
May
23
to Aug 9

Ärztliche Zimmergymnastik

Jesse Aron Green’s celebrated multi-component installation Ärztliche Zimmergymnastik (Medicalized Indoor Gymnastics) (2008) comprises an 80-minute projected video and associated sculptural and photographic works and drawings, all of which were recently acquired by the Harvard Art Museums. The installation takes as its point of departure a book of the same name by German physician Dr. Daniel Gottlob Moritz Schreber (1808–1861). Schreber’s 1858 publication was a popular manual of exercises prescribed for “the maintenance of health and vigor of body and mind.” Green’s installation elegantly and provocatively explores cultural tropes and ideologies of the disciplined body through the lens of modernist art—its operations and its legacies.

Green’s video presents the 45 exercises explained in Schreber’s book, enacted by 16 male performers on wooden platforms arranged as a 4 x 4 grid. The camera documents their movements in a 360-degree tracking shot, which ends at the same moment the performers finish the exercises. A series of photographs that document each of the 45 exercises, drawings, three concrete sculptures, 16 wooden platforms, and a 24-hour backwards-moving clock in homage to Felix Gonzalez-Torres are also included.

The exhibition is made possible by support from the Widgeon Point Charitable Foundation and the José Soriano Fund. Modern and contemporary art programs at the Harvard Art Museums are made possible in part by generous support from the Emily Rauh Pulitzer and Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fund for Modern and Contemporary Art.

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